Nanomaterials Group

Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material’s ability to store energy

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes. The findings are published in Nature Energy.

Today’s batteries, which rely on charge stored in the bulk of their electrodes, offer high energy-storage capacity, but slow charging speeds limit their application in consumer electronics and electric vehicles. Tomorrow’s energy-storage mainstays may be electrochemical capacitors, known as supercapacitors, which store charge at the surface of their electrode material for fast charging and discharging. However, at present supercapacitors lack the charge-storage capacity, or energy density, of batteries.

View the full press release here.

NMG Alumni Success

Our alumni have one success after another.

Alumna Adriana Navarro Suarez was awarded the Marie Curie Fellowship at Imperial College, one of the most prestigious fellowships in the world.

Just as impressive, alumna Kelsey Hatzell has been awarded NSF CAREER grant. This came through after just 2 years at Vanderbilt.

Congratulations to all of our successful alumni!

Council Rock H.S. North Features Trip to Drexel

CR North Honors Experimental Research in STEM students had the opportunity to visit the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute at Drexel University on Tuesday. Drexel University doctoral students and professors discussed their research and toured the students through the cutting edge labs. The students also enjoyed demos and did experiments to explore the properties of various materials. Several North students worked last year in Drexel’s research labs, and this relationship will continue this year.

View the full story here.

 

 

Drexel’s Spray-On Antennas Could Be the Tech Connector of the Future

The promise of wearables, functional fabrics, the Internet of Things, and their “next-generation” technological cohort seems tantalizingly within reach. But researchers in the field will tell you a prime reason for their delayed “arrival” is the problem of seamlessly integrating connection technology — namely, antennas — with shape-shifting and flexible “things.”

But a breakthrough by researchers in Drexel’s College of Engineering, could now make installing an antenna as easy as applying some bug spray.

In research recently published in Science Advances, the group reports on a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers.

Read the full press release here.

Gogotsi Receives Chinese Government Friendship Award

Gogotsi Receives Chinese Government Friendship Award

Congratulations to Prof. Yury Gogotsi, who received the Chinese Government Friendship Award.

The award was presented by Vice-Premier He LIU yesterday. The program culminated in a reception in the Hall of the People given by Premier Li on the occasion of the 69th Anniversary of P.R. China. The group of awardees was featured on Chinese Central Television (CCTV) and other TV stations yesterday and today.
Gogotsi Honored As a Citation Laureate

Gogotsi Honored As a Citation Laureate

Yury Gogotsi, PhD, the Charles T. and Ruth M. Bach Distinguished University Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, has been named a Citation Laureate by Clarivate Analytics for his groundbreaking research advancing the development of carbon-based materials such as carbide-derived carbons, carbon onions, and nanodiamonds, and their applications in capacitive energy storage.

Read the full story here.