Archives by date

You are browsing the site archives by date.

Additional Coverage for Our MXene Sensors Paper

Our MXene sensors paper appeared as the cover article in the February 2018 issue of ACS Nano. This paper was selected as Editors’ Choice (less than 1% of articles published by ACS get this honor) and published as an Open Access article.
This article has already received a lot of coverage online, thanks to a press release from Drexel:

Ariana Selected for 2018 Australia-Americas PhD Research Internship Program

Congratulations to Ph.D. Candidate, Ariana Levitt, who was selected to participate in the NSF 2018 Australia-Americas PhD Research Internship Program. During this eight-week program, Ariana will be conducting research with Dr. Joselito Razal at the Institute for Frontier Materials at Deakin University in Geelong, Australia. She will be continuing her work on the development of MXene-based electrospun fibers for smart textile applications.

Congratulations to Ariana!

Joint Publication with NNFC-KAIST

Our work with KAIST on MXene sensors (S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, 2018) got nice coverage in C&EN:
Congratulations to Kathleen, Babak and our KAIST-NNFC collaborators!

A High(er)-Definition Nose — Drexel’s MXene Material Could Improve Sensors That Sniff

Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person’s breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best “chemical noses” even more sensitive.

In research, recently published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano, the team describes how a two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene can be used as a highly sensitive detector of gaseous chemicals. The paper suggests that MXene can pick up chemicals, such as ammonia and acetone, which are indicators of ulcers and diabetes, in much lower traces than sensors currently being used in medical diagnostics.

Read the full press release here.