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Selective Etching of Silicon from Ti3SiC2 (MAX) Produces 2D Titanium Carbide (MXene)

Congratulations to Mohamed, Kathleen, Tyler, Asia, Christine, Simge and Ariana on publication of their paper that describes synthesis of Ti3C2 MXene by etching Ti3SiC2.  This was the first MAX phase we attempted to etch about 7 years ago, but didn’t initially succeed. Finally, Mohamed accomplished the task using the oxidation/etching technique that my student Goknur Cambaz previously applied to selective etching of SiC whiskers. He further developed and optimized it showing that a large variety of oxidants can be used. Now, we know that not only aluminum can be etched away from MAX phases to produce MXenes. Congratulation on this accomplishment!
M. Alhabeb, K. Maleski, T. S. Mathis, A. Sarycheva, C. B. Hatter, S. Uzun, A. Levitt, Y. Gogotsi, Selective Etching of Silicon from Ti3SiC2 (MAX) Produces 2D Titanium Carbide (MXene), Angewandte Chemie, Int. Ed., (2018)
Congratulations to Amanda

Congratulations to Amanda

Congratulations to BS/PhD student, Amanda Pentecost, who successfully defended her doctoral dissertation, titled “Nanodiamond-based drag delivery system for the modulation of macrophage behavior”. Amanda is co-advised by Prof. Yury Gogotsi (MSE) and Prof. Kara Spiller (BMES).

Amanda started her career at Drexel as a BS/PhD student. She joined our group as a STAR student after less than a year at Drexel and continued all the way to her PhD degree, earning MS in Biomedical engineering, doing co-op in China and spending a year in Korea on her way to PhD.  She won several fellowships on her way to degree completion (NSF GRFP, Whitraker and Boren).



On February 26, 2018, the Drexel University Libraries and the Office of the Provost hosted the sixth annual Celebrating Drexel Authors Event. This year, the event honored a total of 77 Drexel authors with publications in 2017. All 5 individuals honored from the College of Engineering who were recognized for publishing Highly Cited (Web of Science) papers in 2017 were from our MSE department.  Read the full story here.

Congratulations to all of the authors!


PA Junior Academy of Science Awardees Science Fair

PA Junior Academy of Science Awardees Science Fair

Three of our visiting high school students have won 1st place prizes at the PA Junior Academy of Science.  They will proceed to the State competition next in State College, PA.  The students are advised by current PhD students, Kanit Hantanasirisakul and Kathleen Maleski.

Congratulations to all!


Additional Coverage for Our MXene Sensors Paper

Our MXene sensors paper appeared as the cover article in the February 2018 issue of ACS Nano. This paper was selected as Editors’ Choice (less than 1% of articles published by ACS get this honor) and published as an Open Access article.
This article has already received a lot of coverage online, thanks to a press release from Drexel:

Ariana Selected for 2018 Australia-Americas PhD Research Internship Program

Congratulations to Ph.D. Candidate, Ariana Levitt, who was selected to participate in the NSF 2018 Australia-Americas PhD Research Internship Program. During this eight-week program, Ariana will be conducting research with Dr. Joselito Razal at the Institute for Frontier Materials at Deakin University in Geelong, Australia. She will be continuing her work on the development of MXene-based electrospun fibers for smart textile applications.

Congratulations to Ariana!

Joint Publication with NNFC-KAIST

Our work with KAIST on MXene sensors (S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, 2018) got nice coverage in C&EN:
Congratulations to Kathleen, Babak and our KAIST-NNFC collaborators!

A High(er)-Definition Nose — Drexel’s MXene Material Could Improve Sensors That Sniff

Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person’s breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best “chemical noses” even more sensitive.

In research, recently published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano, the team describes how a two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene can be used as a highly sensitive detector of gaseous chemicals. The paper suggests that MXene can pick up chemicals, such as ammonia and acetone, which are indicators of ulcers and diabetes, in much lower traces than sensors currently being used in medical diagnostics.

Read the full press release here.

ACS Editors’ Choice Article on MXene Gas Sensors

Researchers from the Nanomaterials Group have just published a high-impact article on MXene gas sensors produced with our KAIST collaborators:
S. J. Kim, H.-J. Koh, C. E. Ren, O. Kwon, K. Maleski, S.-Y. Cho, B. Anasori, C.-K. Kim, Y.-K. Choi, J. Kim, Y. Gogotsi, H.-T. Jung, Metallic Ti3C2Tx MXene gas sensors with ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio, ACS Nano, (2018)
It has been selected by ACS as ACS Editors’ Choice article and published Open Access ($3000 fee waived). ACS selects a  paper per day (less than 1% of all papers published) from more than 50 ACS journals as “Editors’ Choice”, so it’s an important recognition that adds visibility to our paper.
We demonstrate that a metallic 2D MXene gas-sensing channel with high conductivity greatly outperforms conventional sensing materials in two critical aspects. First, a Ti3C2Tx gas sensor exhibits a limit of detection of 50~100 parts per billion (ppb) for volatile organic compounds, which is one of the lowest limits of their detection at room temperature ever reported. Second, the extremely low noise of metallic Ti3C2Tx leads to the signal-to-noise ratio two orders of magnitude higher than that of the published sensors. This study introduces a paradigm shift from semiconducting to metallic sensing channels for developing highly sensitive sensors.
The first author, Seon Joon (Steven) Kim, is a former visiting student who spent 6 months at Drexel during his PhD study. We expect him to come back to Drexel as a visiting post-doctoral scientist supported by our NNFC-KAIST-Drexel Nano Co-op Center soon.
Congratulations to Steven, Kathleen, Evelyn, Babak and other co-authors!